St. Thomas Episcopal Church | Medina

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Thoughts and Happenings

Sharing Our Stories: Monday Edition

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Sharing Our Stories: Monday Edition

This was an email originally sent out to the parish on Monday, May 18, 2020.

Hi friends:

Here are the latest group of stories we have collected. This is a wonderful way for us to stay connected with one another and to accompany one another on this journey. We would love to have YOUR story. Check out the broad guidelines HERE.  And if you have already submitted a story, please let us have another one!
 

Reflection  BY ANONYMOUS

There is something unsettling about being a member of a church where 91% of the congregation is either an attorney or a physician.  The following moment is for the rest of us living through a pandemic:

 1. This morning I saw my neighbor talking to her cat. It was obvious she thought her cat understood her. I came into the house, told my dog...we had a good laugh together.

 2. Post-It note: 6:00 PM, Removed my Day Pajamas, put on my Night Pajamas.

 3. Public Service Announcement: Every few days try your jeans on just to make sure they fit. Pajamas will have you believing all is well in the kingdom.

 4. I need to practice social distancing from ... my refrigerator.

 5. My body has absorbed so much soap and disinfectant lately that when I pee it cleans the toilet.

 6. I just put liquor bottles in every room of the house. Tonight I’m getting all dressed up and going bar hopping.

 7. I have found if you keep a glass of wine in each hand it is impossible to  accidentally touch your face.

 8. Homeschooling is going okay? Two students suspended for fighting, and one teacher fired for drinking on the job.

 9. Day 27 of Homeschooling: One of these little monsters called in a bomb threat.

 10. Day 44 of Homeschooling: My child said “I sure hope I don’t have the same teacher next year.” I was offended.

When the whole world shifts, God's Hand is Steady from Joseph Murashie

Spring is here. With a little more time on my hands, and God’s Spirit, I have been resurrecting a neighbor’s forgotten garden of raspberries currently invaded by some blackberries after 8 years of being forgotten. I am happy to say that I have removed the blackberries and pruned the raspberry bushes and now see a vast growth of new stems with raspberry flowers at the top. My neighbor, who just turned 90 has been thanking me for fulfilling one of her desires for fresh raspberries! Marlena and I pass this revived garden of raspberries with a smile as we enjoy the parade of nature at sunset from the dock and sailboat and share an early dinner watching for ducks, eagles coots, beavers, and ospreys. We’re still waiting to see the otters. Thanks be to God!

Reflection by Sally Hayman

Our next to last service at St. Thomas was our son Robert's memorial on March 5.  How lucky we were to have it before the lockdown.  It was a comfort to us and wonderful to have support from so many friends.  Shortly after that, Mirabella, where we moved in October, went into lockdown.  All physical contact between residents was banned, and meals are delivered in paper cartons . Actually, it is not so bad as the meals are good, and we can eat them on our own dishes.  I also like the time and space it has given us as a period of mourning.  We do not have to "carry on" or make the social effort to talk to new friends.

But at some point I realized, that this is not about me.  It's not about Washington state, or the U. S.  It's the whole world.  I hate to think of all the people relying on the next paycheck, the people who can't pay rent, the landlords who can't pay the mortgage, the people who are hungry, and those who have to work in dangerous conditions.  All these people are taking a huge hit to protect  us old folk who don't have to work.  

I am finding virtual cocktail parties and zoom meetings unsatisfactory.  I would love love to go to church and to get a haircut.  But these concerns are trivial compared to those of the hairdresser, for example.

Missing you all so much, and the strength of your collective prayers.

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